10 Steps to Creating Killer LinkedIn Content

Sure you’ve heard of LinkedIn, but do you market your content on LinkedIn?  You probably should.  

While the LinkedIn of the past may have been just a secure place to keep your resumé, the professional networking site has developed into much more.  With 400 million members, 40 percent of whom check their accounts daily, LinkedIn has become one of the most important social media platforms for content marketing.

What exactly are we talking about here?  LinkedIn Pulse.  Released pretty quietly back in 2014, LinkedIn Pulse is the LinkedIn version of a news feed.  Now, any Linkedin member can publish a blog or article on the feed, and LinkedIn’s algorithms will pick and choose what articles are relevant to you based on your industry and your existing network.

What does that mean for you?  You have a captive audience of business professionals at your fingertips just waiting for that awesome content we’re sure you’ve been working on!
You already write content for your website, blog, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and emails.  LinkedIn is no different.  It’s a social networking site that is primed to deliver the right type of optimized content to the right type of potential leads. The trick is tweaking your content to make sure it performs well on LinkedIn. Here’s 10 ways you should be customizing your content for LinkedIn platform to reach more people and generate more leads for your company:


On LinkedIn, you’re writing for business professionals.  Most of them are checking their accounts while they’re in line for coffee, on the bus on their way to work, or in between meetings.  They don’t have a ton of time to sit around reading lengthy content. LinkedIn posts with the most views are under 1,000 words, so that’s where you should aim to be.  Anything longer than that and people are likely to skip right by you.  


As any content writer knows, your title is important.  Like, really important.  Especially on the LinkedIn Pulse format.  LinkedIn shows a feed of titles on the left side of Pulse, and then puts actual, full-length articles in the middle of the page.  That means that unless you’re magically featured as the first article, people are going to pick your blog from a list of titles.  So make it compelling.  Numbers, lists, tips, and action words are the best way to grab attention.  Who’s going to click on “Make your LinkedIn posts better” when “5 ways to create killer LinkedIn content” is an option?


Write about what you know:

Your goal for LinkedIn (or what your goal should be) is to establish yourself as an authority in your industry to gain followers and generate leads. So, write about what you know. Your customers ask you questions all the time, so address those questions in your article. If a few people are asking your company, odds are there are plenty of people out there in cyberspace who would like to know the answer too.


Pick a good topic:

While your customers might have a lot of questions, and while you might have a lot of information you’d like to get out there, it’s important that you pick one concise topic for each post.  Answer one question, or pick one very narrow aspect of your industry and explain it in an easy to digest way that is clear and thorough.  You don’t want to overwhelm with too much information, and you don’t want to be too vague.  Use bullet points and numbered lists to help separate and keep information clear.  


When to publish:

Think about when your audience is going to be available.  Your article will go live as soon as you hit the publish button, but if you publish it at 1 AM on a Saturday night, no one’s going to see it.  Make sure you schedule your posts so that they are intentional, and make sense for the average business professional.  Monday mornings? Probably not a great idea. People are getting to work and catching up on emails from the weekend.  Try a Thursday lunch time instead.  



Just like any social media, your visuals on LinkedIn are a big deal.  Visuals are what pull people in, and keep them interested.  So, if you have high-quality photos and engaging infographics, you’re likely to get people into your article, and maybe even get them to follow you, ensuring they’ll be around for the next post.

Publish consistently:

It’s a good idea to create a schedule and stick to it.  If you publish consistently, you’re more likely to develop a solid follower base and get more views.  The more people who follow you, the more views you’ll get.  Start by publishing once a week, every week, and see what that does for you.  Since LinkedIn is a little less interactive than Facebook and Twitter, every-day posts might just do more harm than good.

Respond to comments:

Once you’ve published your optimized-for-LinkedIn content, make sure you keep track of it.  When you get comments, respond to them!  This is one of the best ways to expand your network and potentially generate more leads, because commenters are people who are genuinely interested in your product and what you have to say.  Respond to them, and make those connections.

Check the analytics:

A super-handy aspect of LinkedIn Pulse is that it provides you with some pretty thorough analytics about your posts.  They’ll even send you emails telling you how your posts are doing: how many views, shares or comments they’ve gotten.  Take that information in, and use it to your advantage. If a how-to post was outstandingly successful, consider making another one on a different topic.  If one post didn’t work at all, take that into consideration, and stay away from that topic or format for a while.

Tweet Tip @linkedinpulse:

If you’ve got great content and you know it, it can’t hurt to give yourself a shoutout.  If you posted a great article, and after a few hours it’s still not getting much traffic, tweet Tip @linkedinpulse.  Tell them why your post is feature-worthy, and they might consider it. If they do feature it, you’re likely to get a lot of views, but your content will have to be awesome.


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